Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Memory as a way of knowing: remembering TOK1

Memory as a Way of Knowing
  • How do we know through memory?
    • Carry knowledge gained forward (skills; past experiences)
  • Identity grows with memory
    • Implications: example – child soldiers
  • KQ: Is memory a reliable way of knowing?
    • One answer: Supreme Court, USA, 2011 decided that memory is not reliable (case: State v Henderson)
    • KQ: What are the dangers to knowledge of overemphasizing the unreliability of memory?
  • How do we use memory?  How do we evaluate memory?
  • Additional concepts: bias, suggestibility, personal testimony v collective memory
Contemporary real-life situations
How memory works

Remembering IB Theory of Knowledge 1—essential lessons & topics
  • “Cup stack” [communication & collaboration]
  • IB learner profile
  • The map is not the territory [upside-down world map]
  • Self-as-a-knower
  • Creating TOK blog
  • Mouse who ate the cheese
  • Does it matter if what you believe is true?
  • Truth tests
  • Superstition
  • Knowledge by acquaintance v Knowledge by description
  • Types of knowledge  (empirical, rational, value judgment, metaphysical)
  • Definition(s) of knowledge
  • Ways of knowing [language, sense perception, imagination, memory]
  • Areas of knowledge [the arts, human sciences, and some natural sciences, mathematics, history and literature]
  • Does literature make you nicer?
  • TOK key skills: knowledge claims, knowledge questions, unpacking the knowledge frameworks, justify, evaluate
  • “The 16th Man”
  • “The Thin Blue Line”
  • “Turning powerful stats into art”
  • Sturgis IB Theatre & climate change
  • The TOK essay – introduction
  • The TOK presentation - introduction
Final blog post
How has the course IB Theory of Knowledge 1 impacted you as a learner and in the real world?
Give yourself self-ratings [A, B, C] on each: attendance, attention, participation, prepared 

Thank you all for a great year!  I’ve learned from each of you J
Your summer TOK HW: find TOK links in daily life experiences, listen and converse to keep your critical thinking skills sharp


Friday, June 6, 2014

Optional TOK assignment

Structured development of a relevant knowledge question on a real-life situation
  • Complete the steps in the Optional TOK assignment
  • DUE by the start of class on Wednesday, 11 June
    • Late submissions will not be accepted

Sunday, June 1, 2014

Real-life situation: small group presentations

TOK presentations on a real-life situation
  • Presentation ideas by Friday, 23 May
  • Presentation prep: Monday, 2 June
    • Visuals (PowerPoint) should present the TOK connections outlined below explicitly
      • Describe briefly the real-life situation - who? what? when? where?
      • Identify relevant TOK concepts, AOK and WOK
      • Write one or more knowledge questions
      • Outline at least two perspectives to "answer" the knowledge questions
      • Evaluate the strengths & weaknesses of the chosen perspectives
  • Presentations in class
    • TOK1D: Wednesday, 4 June & Monday, 9 June
    • TOK1F: Wednesday, 4 June & Friday, 6 June
    • 5-6 minutes (this is not a full TOK presentation, so complete analysis is not expected)
    • You'll hand in one group TK/PPD by Wednesday, 11 June (preferred with presentation)
  • Advice
    • Focus on TOK concepts
    • Review the TOK presentation rubric and the advice given earlier for TOK essays
      • Use the "shock art" model: write a knowledge claim, identify relevant TOK concepts; develop knowledge questions; choose concrete examples; describe & evaluate different perspectives; include personal connections; review the TOK knowledge frameworks

Friday, May 23, 2014

TOK assessment practice: individual essay and small group presentation

TOK essay practice
  • Writing day in class
    • TOK1D: Wednesday, 28 May
    • TOK1F: Thursday, 29 May
    • You'll print a draft of the introduction by the end of class
      • You may hand in a revised final copy of the introduction by Friday, 12:30pm
        • Please give me a paper copy or leave one in my mailbox.
  • You may prepare an outline or draft for class
  • Word count = introduction paragraph (250 words ± 25)
    • Optional longer essay draft word count = 500-1000 (± 25)
  • Times, 12-point font, double-spaced
  • Advice
    • Use the "shock art" model: write a knowledge claim, identify relevant TOK concepts, develop knowledge questions, choose concrete examples, describe & evaluate different perspectives, include personal connections, review the TOK essay rubric & knowledge frameworks
Essay prompts - choose one
A.  "A map is only useful if it simplifies things."  To what extent does this apply to knowledge?
B.  To what extent are areas of knowledge shaped by their past?  Consider with reference to two areas of knowledge.

Coming up - TOK presentations
  • Presentation ideas by Friday, 23 May
  • Presentation prep: Monday, 2 June
    • Visuals (PowerPoint) should present the TOK connections outlined below explicitly
      • Describe briefly the real-life situation - who? what? when? where?
      • Identify relevant TOK concepts, AOK and WOK
      • Write one or more knowledge questions
      • Outline at least two perspectives to "answer" the knowledge questions
      • Evaluate the strengths & weaknesses of the chosen perspectives
  • Presentations in class
    • TOK1D: Wednesday, 4 June & Monday, 9 June
    • TOK1F: Wednesday, 4 June & Friday, 6 June
    • 5-6 minutes (this is not a full TOK presentation, so complete analysis is not expected)
    • You'll hand in one group TK/PPD by Wednesday, 11 June
  • Advice
    • Focus on TOK concepts
    • Review the TOK presentation rubric and the essay advice given above.

Wednesday, May 21, 2014

Shared and personal knowledge: Theatre, Visual Arts, and Climate Change

Welcome to our IB Theatre visitors!  
Thanks for sharing your work on the climate change project with TOK!







TOK concepts
  • Shared knowledge v personal knowledge
  • The "zone of exchange": the contact between the shared and the personal that stimulates questioning and exploration?
Questions for thought:
  • To what extent can a global issue, such as climate change, be solved through interdisciplinary learning and action?
  • How has the shared knowledge of the arts impacted your understanding of social or scientific real-life situation (ie, zone of exchange)?


Tuesday, May 13, 2014

Human sciences: are the human sciences "soft"?

Coming up: small group presentations - analysing real-life situations
Today's classwork: group work
TOK1D: Wednesday, 14 May
TOK1F: Friday, 16 May
  • Review the knowledge frameworks for the human sciences from the TOK subject guide (scroll down to the human sciences)
  • Read Soft sciences are often harder than hard sciences
    • Read the final paragraph, then
    • Read from page 35 (bottom of left column) from "To understand the terms soft and hard science..."  through page 36 (top left column), paragraph beginning, "Scientists do this all the time, whether or not they think about it."
    • Read at least one of Diamond's AOK examples
  • Deciding with your group members, order a list of (5+) human sciences fields from "soft" to "hard"
    • Justify your ranking with references to ideas in the human sciences knowledge frameworks
  • Give a brief presentation of group "rankings" and two reasons (justifications)
    • Hand in your group prep work (all group member names at the top, please): ranking & notes on justifications (cite student name(s) for ideas)

Monday, May 12, 2014

Investigating knowledge in the arts

You'll work on one group task: Arts: A, B or C

Individual assignment: blog post due on Friday, 16 May, 3.10 pm
Q1-4 from Chapter 15 on AOK: the arts, Dombrowski et al. (2013)
  1. What Ways of Knowing (WOK) do the arts use?
  2. Do you see yourself differently because of your participation in the arts?
  3. To what extent is it important to base generalizations about the arts on a sample from different historical and cultural contexts?
  4. According to what criteria are works of art judged?  To what extent do artists, critics, and members of the general public audience all share criteria for evaluating a work of art?
  5. from the TOK subject guide: Is there any point in discussing the arts - should we not simply experience them?